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analysts are doing right now backed in their headquarters. they're using very cutting edge technological tools to mine any of the data that they are able to pull from the first suspect who was killed early this morning. so his travel records, phone records, anything that they could look at, social security number to figure out who might be in the ever-expanding circle of people who knew him. these cutting edge tools would also look on the internet. did these individuals and this is a new thing that happened post-9/11 is that when you are confronted with a potential terrorism threat and knew the individual the first thing you did was go to social media, check on facebook, check on, you know, twitter. >> speak of twitter, the boston police department just tweeted an hour ago, an alert to the media not to disclose the tactical information to compromise officer safety with the homes that are being searched. there are a lot of crews up in boston and a lot of people covering this and a lot of risks in there. >> with the fact that the individuals had ieds with them overnight and were throwing t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
feel, the way th you think. some of the new technologies i like is this virtual realities where we take you to the lab and you're actually watching the video of this scene and slowly monitoring your heart rate, your blood pressure, and over time, that's the word that you use, it's to desensitize you to that trauma. it's almost like being afraid of height and you go back again to the same thing and you get better and better. that's a big thing, exposure therapy, that's a big part of it. >> jamie: are you talking about like two weeks of treatment, a month of treatment, or some people are genetically prone to anxiety where maybe they need to be, you know, protectively on some treatment? >> absolutely. it may be months and months, or it may actually lead into underlying psychiatric problems that preexisted this that may be brought out. there's a group of people that not only -- cognitive behavioral therapy is number one. david is right. diversionary activities are important, too, getting back to laughter and daily life is hugely important. jamie, for some of us, it's necessary to give medic
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
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